Healthy Eating

What’s the Big Deal About Collagen?

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You may have seen the word collagen popping up lately in health and nutrition articles, but what exactly is it?

Collagen is a special type of protein in the body that is particularly important in having healthy joints, skin, hair, nails, and digestion. According to natural medicine guru Dr. Josh Axe, "it's the 'glue' that helps hold the body together."

Our natural production of collagen slows down as we age – even faster if we eat a high sugar diet or smoke cigarettes.

The best sources of collagen can be difficult to find and incorporate into a healthy diet, as it’s derived from uncommon animal parts, such as the bones, skin and connective tissue.

Consuming homemade or high quality bone broth is an excellent way to ingest collagen, but did you know that it also comes in powder form?

My favourite brand is this Bulletproof Upgraded Collagen, which I order online at The Canadian Vitamin Shop.

It dissolves easily into both hot and cold liquids, making it the perfect complement for tea, coffee, or even a green morning smoothie.

It's never been easier to give your skin, hair, nails, joints, and tummy the quality collagen they've been craving. What are you waiting for?

Originally Published: June 11, 2018

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Carolyn Coffin, Contributor and Health Coach at Eat Real Food Academy

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Carolyn Coffin empowers people to crave the foods that help them thrive. A former physiotherapist turned health coach and educator, Carolyn uses a unique blend of nutrition, lifestyle, and mindset coaching to help her clients feel their best. She works privately with people all over North America and offers an engaged online community and affordable group coaching through her website eatrealfoodacademy.com. Carolyn enjoys going for a run in the great outdoors, visiting her local farmers’ market, and living a healthy lifestyle with her family.



My Favourite Oatmeal Substitute

So many people love to eat oatmeal for breakfast. Heck, I used to be one of them!

It’s quick. It’s easy. It’s delicious.

And its fibre content and cholesterol- lowering properties have earned it a reputation for being one of the healthiest and most virtuous of breakfast choices amongst modern health-conscious eaters. Oatmeal sure seems to have a lot going for it. So why did I give it up?

I’m not saying oatmeal is a bad choice – especially if you’re a high calorie burner or athlete, but from a nutrient- density and insulin-stimulating (aka: fat storage) standpoint, there are better options. (Like bacon and eggs with a side of sweet potatoes and avocado. Mmm!)

Here’s what I’ve noticed, though. The oatmeal-loving breakfast crowd doesn’t abandon their morning bowl of mush at the drop of a hat just because some so-called expert hit them with a bunch of nutrition facts.

Just hear me out for a minute. Imagine if you could recreate a morning bowl of mush that has the same look and feel as regular oatmeal, but with even more nutrients and virtually zero insulin-stimulating properties?

Imagine this magical bowl of mush has the same great taste, but keeps the hunger pangs at bay all the way until lunchtime. Enter ... primal porridge. It’s just like oatmeal but without the oats. It’s no-oat-meal.

Primal porridge is a delicious oatmeal substitute made out of nuts, seeds and banana. It can be prepped in the same amount of time as regular oatmeal – even less if you make a big batch of dry mix in advance.

And the same standard toppings work well — such as berries, shredded coconut, chopped apple, nuts, and raisins. With all of this natural sweetness, even the brown sugar is optional.

What do you have to lose by giving primal porridge a try (other than maybe a few pounds)?

If you like it, please share it with your family and friends so we can spread the real-food-lover’s porridge recipe far and wide.


PRIMAL PORRIDGE

It has the same look and feel as regular oatmeal, but without the oats.

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Prep time: 10 mins   |   Cook Time: 5 mins   |   Total time: 15 mins   |   Serves: 2 servings

INGREDIENTS

DRY MIX:

  • 1 small handful walnuts
  • 1 small handful pecans
  • 2 tbsp ground flax seed
  • 1⁄2-1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • pinch ground nutmeg
  • pinch ground ginger

WET MIX:

  • 1 egg
  • 1⁄4 cup unsweetened almond milk (coconut milk works well too)
  • 1 tbsp almond butter (sunflower seed butter works well too)
  • 1 banana

TOPPINGS (OPTIONAL):

  • pumpkin or sunflower seeds
  • shredded coconut, unsweetened
  • handful berries
  • apple, chopped
  • raisins

INSTRUCTIONS

Place walnuts, pecans, ax seed, cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger in food processor. Pulse to coarse texture (stop before reaching fine powder) and set aside. Tip: Make extra dry mix to use another day. Store in a sealed container and refrigerate (or freeze).

Using a blender or Magic Bullet, mix egg, almond milk, almond butter, and banana. Tip: Extra wet mix can be stored in the fridge, but only for about two days.

Pour both wet mix and dry mix into a saucepan and stir until thoroughly combined.

Cook over low-medium heat, stirring continuously for about 4-5 minutes or until desired consistency is reached. (Steps 4 and 5 can be completed in microwave if desired. If so, microwave for 1 minute and stir. Repeat if necessary.)

Transfer to a bowl, sprinkle with toppings and add a splash of almond milk if desired.

 

Originally Published: December 11, 2017

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Carolyn Coffin, Contributor and Health Coach at Eat Real Food Academy

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Carolyn Coffin empowers people to crave the foods that help them thrive. A former physiotherapist turned health coach and educator, Carolyn uses a unique blend of nutrition, lifestyle, and mindset coaching to help her clients feel their best. She works privately with people all over North America and offers an engaged online community and affordable group coaching through her website eatrealfoodacademy.com. Carolyn enjoys going for a run in the great outdoors, visiting her local farmers’ market, and living a healthy lifestyle with her family.



Tips for Staying Healthy on the Road

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There is perhaps no greater test of how committed you are to your health habits than travelling. Being out of your regular routine, eating

in restaurants and socializing with others — all without the comforts of home — can be a perfect storm for eating junk food, skipping workouts and staying up way too late.

If this sounds like you, please know you’re not alone! Maintaining good eating, moving and sleeping habits while on vacation or away from home is one of the biggest stumbling blocks I hear about from clients. And I’ve experienced it, too.

Luckily, there are some creative ways to feel well on the road. Pack a cooler and utensils. It may sound obvious, but access to healthy snacks can either make or break your experience. Fill it with whole foods that travel well like raw veggies, muffins, pancakes, energy balls, hard-boiled eggs, jerky, apple chips, cheese, Greek yogurt, trail mix, fruit and dark chocolate. Throw in some condiments like guacamole, salad dressing, mayonnaise and salsa for ready-made meals or snacks on a moment’s notice.

Eventually you will have to eat at a restaurant. Do not panic. There are always healthy options, even if it means having to ask for them.

Here are my favourite “special requests” at restaurants.

  • Can the kids please order off adult menus? (Let’s face it, grilled cheese sandwiches, pizza, chicken fingers, spaghetti and fries that comprise nearly every kids’ menu don’t exactly scream nutrient density!)
  • Can you please hold the breadbasket? Ditto for croutons?
  • Is it possible to have a grilled chicken breast instead of the breaded one?
  • Do you have oil and vinegar dressing? And could I please have that on the side?

As for staying active, try these tips.

  • Get a hotel with a pool. Particularly for those with young children, this tip will keep you active for hours!
  • Check out your hotel’s exercise room for a brief, high-intensity weight workout or long, slow cardio session.
  • Discover your surroundings. Is there a mountain to climb? A trail to jog or hike? A beach to sprint or toss a flying disc? A lake to swim in? A park to chase your kids around
  • Checkout the city on a bike or on foot. Most cities now have affordable bike drops that allow you to do your own exploring on wheels powered by you. Or kick it back old school with a comfortable pair of walking shoes. It’s always surprising how much ground can be covered on foot.

    Once you know a few simple tricks of the trade, you’ll be able to return home from stints away feeling just as amazing as when you left.

Road Trip Recipe 101

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PRIMAL POPPERS

Prep time: 15 mins

Total time: 15 mins

Serves: 3 dozen

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup sunflower seed butter (or almond butter if no nut allergies)
  • 1.5 cups unsweetened coconut, shredded
  • 8-10 figs or dates
  • 1/2 cup dark chocolate chips
  • 1/4 cup ground flaxseed
  • 4 tbsp honey
  • 2 tbsp cocoa
  • 1-2 scoops protein powder (chocolate or vanilla)
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence

INSTRUCTIONS

Mix all ingredients in food processor until paste forms. Form into bite-sized balls.
Eat immediately or freeze to make them last longer!

 

Originally Published: October 14, 2017

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Carolyn Coffin, Contributor and Health Coach at Eat Real Food Academy

+ Read Bio

Carolyn Coffin empowers people to crave the foods that help them thrive. A former physiotherapist turned health coach and educator, Carolyn uses a unique blend of nutrition, lifestyle, and mindset coaching to help her clients feel their best. She works privately with people all over North America and offers an engaged online community and affordable group coaching through her website eatrealfoodacademy.com. Carolyn enjoys going for a run in the great outdoors, visiting her local farmers’ market, and living a healthy lifestyle with her family.



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Chocolate Cravings? You might be low in magnesium (the miracle mineral)

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It’s that time of day again, when your craving for chocolate presents itself and nothing else will do. But with your fall health routine beginning to pairing back after summer– what can you do about it?

Although cocoa is touted as healthy because of its antioxidant properties, most of us experience guilt or frustration when we give in to our cravings for rich, delicious chocolate. Well, feel guilty no longer, there may be a solution for you—and it’s as simple as a magnesium supplement that has no calories at all. But pay attention to your cravings! They are a very good sign magnesium is just what your body needs since chocolate is, in fact, one of our richest dietary sources.

Studies have found, and my clinical experience has confirmed, that chocolate cravings and PMS symptoms improve with daily magnesium supplements. But that’s not all this mineral can help you with.... keep reading to discover the many benefits of magnesium.

Beats fatigue

... chocolate cravings and PMS symptoms improve with daily magnesium supplements.

For a long time now, it has been suggested that chronic fatigue syndrome is related to persistent magnesium deficiency, which may improve with magnesium supplements. Magnesium is a wonderful mineral that is involved in over 300 enzymatic reactions in the body. When we are magnesium deficient, our bodily functions slow down at the cellular level, causing everything to become sluggish until eventually physical or mental fatigue eventually ensues.

Eases anxiety, improves sleep and stabilizes mood

Individuals with anxiety have been found to have lower levels of magnesium. This may be linked to the fact that a magnesium deficiency causes the release of adrenalin. Also, other studies have found that magnesium supplements reduce the release and effect of stress hormones on the heart, which is an indirect measure of the mineral’s effect on the brain.

In the elderly, magnesium supplements were found to improve sleep by decreasing the release of the stress hormone cortisol, which is known to cause sleep disruption. Magnesium glycinate (400 to 600mg) at bedtime is my favourite starting place for most cases of sleep disruption, for all ages.

Reduces muscle cramping

Ever get those irritating little twitches in your eyelid? Or maybe painful muscle cramping, waking you at night or ruining your workout? These are both possible signs of magnesium deficiency since it is closely involved in proper muscle relaxation and contraction. Try taking 200 to 600mg of magnesium at bedtime and you may be surprised at how quickly these symptoms may respond to your efforts.

Athletes can be especially prone to magnesium loss from sweating. Meanwhile, an athlete prone to loose stools will have an even greater risk of deficiency. I once treated an adventure racer with this exact condition. He used to develop cramps so severe his teammates would have to carry him during competitions. I fixed his digestive issues, supplemented minerals and he was back in action in no time. I recommend mineral supplement containing magnesium and foods high in the mineral-like seeds, nuts and green leafy veggies to all of my athletes to maintain their performance.

Magnesium and blood pressure

Evidence suggests that magnesium may play an important role in regulating blood pressure, due to its natural muscle relaxant ability. When blood vessels are relaxed there is less resistance to the flow of blood and as a result, lower blood pressure.

Diets that provide high sources of potassium and magnesium— such as those that are high in fruits and vegetables—are consistently associated with lower blood pressure.

The DASH study (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) suggested that high blood pressure could be significantly lowered by consuming a diet high in magnesium, potassium and calcium, and low in sodium and fat. In another study, the effect of various nutritional factors on high blood pressure was examined in over 30,000 U.S. male health professionals. After four years of follow-up, researchers found that a greater magnesium intake was significantly associated with lower risk of hypertension. The evidence is strong enough that the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure recommends maintaining an adequate magnesium intake as a positive lifestyle modification for preventing and managing high blood pressure.

Magnesium and heart disease

Magnesium deficiency can cause metabolic changes that may contribute to heart attacks and strokes, while higher blood levels are associated with a lower risk of these conditions. There is also evidence that low body stores of magnesium increase the risk of abnormal heart rhythms, which in turn may increase the risk of complications associated with a heart attack.

Magnesium and osteoporosis

Calcium isn’t the only mineral we need for strong, healthy bones.

It appears a magnesium deficiency may also be a risk factor for osteoporosis. This may be due to the effect of magnesium deficiency on calcium metabolism and the hormone that regulates calcium balance in the body. I normally recommend 600 to 800mg of magnesium along with 1000 to 1200mg of calcium daily to all adults to treat and prevent bone density loss.

Magnesium and diabetes

Magnesium is important to carbohydrate metabolism. It may influence the release and activity of insulin, the hormone that helps control blood glucose levels. Elevated blood glucose levels increase the loss of magnesium in the urine, which in turn lowers blood levels of magnesium. This explains why low blood levels of magnesium are seen in poorly controlled type 1 and type 2 diabetes. These low levels of the mineral may also contribute to hypertension commonly found with many diabetics.

Okay, if, after all of this fantastic news about magnesium, you just can’t get past your chocolate craving, then at least choose the best chocolate. Look for a minimum 70 percent or more cocoa solids. It’s the healthiest way to satisfy a craving for chocolate, without consuming all the sugar and saturated fat common with milk chocolate.

Originally Published: September 28, 2017

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Dr. Natasha Turner, NDContributor and Founder & Director of Clear Medicine Wellness Boutique  

+ Read Bio

Dr. Natasha Turner, ND is a regular contributor to various publications and television programs as a natural health expert. Shows like The Dr. Oz Show, The Marilyn Denis Show, Canada AM, CP24, CTV News, Breakfast Television, Rogers TV, Shaw TV, and more have used her expertise to educate audiences. Print publications include SELF, ELLE, Glow, Canadian Business, Health, Today’s Parent, Lush The Magazine, Alive, National Post, Metro, Tonic, Vista, Fit Life, Cocoa, Viva, Healthy Living Now, Get Outside, and several websites, including a regular column for Chatelaine.com, Blisstree.com, and Huffingtonpost.ca.



Is Intermittent Fasting for You?

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Our fasting bodies change how they select which fuel to burn, improving metabolism and reducing oxidative stress. Today’s intermittent fasting regimens are easier to stick to, and proven to help excess pounds melt away. Studies have clearly shown that our bodies respond to fasting by boosting glucagon, adiponectin and growth hormone - the hormone that helps build muscle. A scientific review in the British Journal of Diabetes and Vascular Disease suggests that fasting diets may also help those with diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Intermittent fasting involves avoiding food intake for one day per week. During your cleanse day, you should drink at least four quarts of warm or cold herbal teas to support the cleansing process. I recommend a combination of herbs with anti- inflammatory and diuretic effects, such as ginger, lemon, blueberry, hibiscus, dandelion, green tea, and parsley. Alternatively, you can use an intermittent fasting support mixed into four quarts of water to drink throughout the day. If you feel overly hungry, you can consume one or two hard boiled eggs in the morning or a serving of nuts in the afternoon, but try to last the day.

You can also try your cleanse day by first consuming breakfast and then embarking on the cleansing drinks for the next 24 hours. Alternatively, you could fast all day and have a high protein meal in the evening. Lots of good options!

The benefits of fasting extend beyond just the 24 hour period, and it does get easier with time and experience. You can do this once every seven to ten days, or even more than once a week if you want to accelerate your plan. I recommend doing your cleanse days on Tuesday or Wednesdays. If you have your cheat meal on the weekend as so many of us do, this will give you a day or two of clean eating to get your insulin back in balance, lessen cravings and steady your appetite.

 

Originally Published: September 25, 2017

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about the author.jpg
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Dr. Natasha Turner, NDContributor and Founder & Director of Clear Medicine Wellness Boutique  

+ Read Bio

Dr. Natasha Turner, ND is a regular contributor to various publications and television programs as a natural health expert. Shows like The Dr. Oz Show, The Marilyn Denis Show, Canada AM, CP24, CTV News, Breakfast Television, Rogers TV, Shaw TV, and more have used her expertise to educate audiences. Print publications include SELF, ELLE, Glow, Canadian Business, Health, Today’s Parent, Lush The Magazine, Alive, National Post, Metro, Tonic, Vista, Fit Life, Cocoa, Viva, Healthy Living Now, Get Outside, and several websites, including a regular column for Chatelaine.com, Blisstree.com, and Huffingtonpost.ca.



The Hormone Boost Kitchen to Boost Your Fat Loss: Part Three

Having stocked cupboards ready with the items you’ll use most often
will make cooking easier. Plus, you won’t be tempted to veer from your plan and get easy, premade food.

I’ve also got a few kitchen tips that have made a difference in my life, and I’m excited for them to help you.

Staple Stock Items and Tips for your Hormone Boost Kitchen

• Replace iodized table salt with Celtic sea salt. This natural option provides trace minerals that are beneficial for your thyroid, adrenal glands, body hydration, energy and overall wellness. It is available for purchase on my website if you can’t find it at your local health food store.

• Stock your kitchen with a high- quality organic extra-virgin olive oil (contained in a dark bottle) and an organic coconut oil. These are also available in spray form at most health food stores— the perfect means for lightly glazing pans with just the right amount of oil.

• Buy low-sodium bouillon cubes, stocks and canned tomatoes. I also am a huge fan of fajita spice packs – President’s Choice is a healthy choice, and organic gravy mix from Simply Organic is great to have on hand for my Carb Craving Shepherd’s Pie. Also, tomato paste adds a great umami flavour or richness to food that you’re trying to keep low in calories and fat. Tomatoes, particularly tomato paste, are bursting with cancer-fighting lycopene. Use it to add an extra layer of flavour to curries and stir- fries.

• Substitute Greek yogurt for sour cream. It is lower in fat and higher in protein.

• You can enhance the flavour and depth of your meals without adding extra salt, using the acidity of vinegar (apple cider or balsamic) or lemon. An added benefit: vinegars also reduce the glycemic impact of your meals.

• When slicing avocados, use a sharp knife to split them in half and remove the pit. Then, keeping the skin intact, cut it into slices. This creates perfect sections, which can then be easily removed from the peel with a spoon, for use in salads and other dishes, or placed on a cookie sheet for freezing. Once the slices are frozen solid, transfer them to a sealed container or freezer bag.

• Maintain the crispness of fresh herbs by washing, rolling in dampened paper towels and placing in resealable bags before storing in your fridge. Some fresh herbs can be washed and stored in your freezer to extend their shelf life for up to one month. Once frozen, they can easily be defrosted and chopped before they hit the pan.

• Beans – Cannellini and lentils are your best protein packed options for soups, salads and dips. Not only are they inexpensive, they’re also a great source of fibre. (One cup, for example, contains a whopping 15 grams of protein and 12 grams of fibre.)

• Frozen shrimp: Four large shrimp are only 30 calories and contain pure protein and virtually no fat. Shrimp also offer up a hefty dose of iodine. Buy them peeled and deveined so they can be easily defrosted and incorporated into last-minute weeknight meals. I love these because they are so versatile; they can be served hot or cold, in shrimp scampi, shrimp tacos, shrimp salad, etc. Plus, along with this, I love Barberian Steak Spice – to pan fry the shrimps to top salad or over zucchini pasta with tomatoes/ balsamic reduction.

• Mustard: This condiment is packed with the immune-boosting mineral selenium and turmeric, a spice (that gives it its yellow pigment) with cancer-fighting properties. Keep a couple different varieties in your refrigerator, including Dijon, for salad dressings, sauces, marinades, and in a coating for breading chicken and pork. Grain mustard is another favourite as a spread on sandwiches.

• Ground chicken and turkey: buying a lean ground turkey or chicken breast saves on saturated fat compared to ground beef. Stash in your freezer and thaw when ready to eat. It’s one meat that cooks in a zip and can be used in stir-fries, meat sauces, tacos, enchiladas, stuffed peppers, or rice bowls.

• Toasted Seeds: Specifically black sesame, white sesame and raw pumpkin seeds. I keep these mixed in a bowl in my fridge to toss into salads, delicious mixed with ricotta cheese or even as a fast mouthful when hungry!

Originally Published: July 31, 2017

Author opinion disclosure.jpg

about the author.jpg
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Dr. Natasha Turner, NDContributor and Founder & Director of Clear Medicine Wellness Boutique  

+ Read Bio

Dr. Natasha Turner, ND is a regular contributor to various publications and television programs as a natural health expert. Shows like The Dr. Oz Show, The Marilyn Denis Show, Canada AM, CP24, CTV News, Breakfast Television, Rogers TV, Shaw TV, and more have used her expertise to educate audiences. Print publications include SELF, ELLE, Glow, Canadian Business, Health, Today’s Parent, Lush The Magazine, Alive, National Post, Metro, Tonic, Vista, Fit Life, Cocoa, Viva, Healthy Living Now, Get Outside, and several websites, including a regular column for Chatelaine.com, Blisstree.com, and Huffingtonpost.ca.



The Hormone Boost Kitchen to Boost Your Fat Loss: Part Two

Being organized and ahead of schedule in the kitchen is essential to making a diet update work. Eating and living healthy should be enjoyable, and with a little preparation plus the “TurnTash Method”, you should be able to eliminate the many things that make it feel like an obstacle.

Below, I go over the essentials for your kitchen that will make preparing Hormone Boost-friendly foods more streamlined. I also like to recommend that as you put your delicious meals together, you try to keep your working area as clean and organized as you can. Staying mindful during this process will not only give you (or a loved one) less clean-up afterwards, but you will also feel more connection with what you are eating and be respectful of the effort you put in to prepare it. Plus, less clutter always equals less stress!

The Kitchen Tools You Must Have

  • Invest in a set of sharp chef knives. As surprising as it sounds, sharp knives are safer than dull ones since they are less likely to slip during use. And trust me: ready access to these essential tools will serve up simple satisfaction with every chop and slice. Already have a set, but they’re dull? Check out this Gordon Ramsay video on how to sharpen your knives at home. It’s easy!

  • Get an immersion blender. This handy gadget will make puréed dips, cauliflower mash and soups a breeze—and it will save you dishes too since your blending action can happen in the same pots used for cooking. (Below I tell you which one I like best.)

  • Add a bench scraper to your utensil drawer. While it sounds like a tool you would need in a carpenter’s kit, it’s considered by many foodies and cooks to be a kitchen essential. It is simply a rectangular piece of metal with a handle across the full width of one edge. It just might be the kitchen tool you never knew you needed—at least until you discover how useful it is. Use your scraper to transfer chopped ingredients from a cutting board with one steady swipe or crush garlic before peeling without the risk of cutting yourself.

  • Become reacquainted with a retro kitchen staple—the Mason jar. These traditional glass bottles are perfect for storing soups and sauces and for making the on- the-go salad recipes included in my book.

  • Rely on stainless steel and glass bowls. These are fundamental in any kitchen. I have them in many sizes (mini ones for holding spices and large ones for prep work). They last a lifetime! It’s an added bonus if you can find a set with lids, as they allow for easy fridge storage of dishes like salads or for marinating meats. They don’t have to be expensive, but if the set comes with plastic lids, make sure they are BPA-free.

  • Search for a spiralizer. Want to cut your carb intake or free yourself from the belly bloat of heavy pasta dishes? A spiralizer is your secret weapon for making virtually carb-free zucchini pasta and offers creative ways to increase your veggie intake (think cucumber, carrots and beets) in salads. There are several variations available from the simple to the more advanced. Different blades give you different “noodles” and keep you excited about carb-free indulgences.

  • Pick up a meat thermometer. A good meat thermometer ensures that roast chicken, beef and other meats are cooked through.

  • Consider devoting one cupboard or drawer solely to the storage of your dry spices. Small glass jars are a perfect way to go—they’re easy to label and arrange, and readily available at your local dollar store. Once you have your storage options in place, many spices can then be purchased in bulk. No space inside a drawer or cupboard? An organized spice rack can be a nice aesthetic addition to your kitchen’s décor – check out these ideas on Pinterest.

Originally Published: July 24, 2017

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Dr. Natasha Turner, NDContributor and Founder & Director of Clear Medicine Wellness Boutique  

+ Read Bio

Dr. Natasha Turner, ND is a regular contributor to various publications and television programs as a natural health expert. Shows like The Dr. Oz Show, The Marilyn Denis Show, Canada AM, CP24, CTV News, Breakfast Television, Rogers TV, Shaw TV, and more have used her expertise to educate audiences. Print publications include SELF, ELLE, Glow, Canadian Business, Health, Today’s Parent, Lush The Magazine, Alive, National Post, Metro, Tonic, Vista, Fit Life, Cocoa, Viva, Healthy Living Now, Get Outside, and several websites, including a regular column for Chatelaine.com, Blisstree.com, and Huffingtonpost.ca.



The Hormone Boost Kitchen to Boost Your Fat Loss: Part One

Healthy habits aren’t all about your body. I fully woke up to the link between environment and well- being two years ago, when my husband and I downsized from our house to a condo. Amid the chaos of half-unpacked boxes, I realized just how important an uncluttered and organized living space is. Our habits suffered because groceries were sparse, pots were MIA, dishes were still packed and our supplements were out of sight. We tripped into bed at night over piles of clothes and folded linens. And during the day, we felt worn out from the constant mental chatter of our to- do lists, and because we were simply unsettled.

In The Hormone Boost, I wrote about the “TurnTash Method”—my silly spin on the popular KonMari Method, which offers a way to declutter your life and bring joy. Embracing this level of organization will make more time for you, and enable you to live The Hormone Boost lifestyle. Consider the following benefits:

• You will be more successful and lose more weight. Organization heightens your ability to be mindful about what you put into your body. My own experience tells me that success begins with thoughts or ideas, takes shape with planning, organization and preparation, and comes to fruition with motivation and commitment to follow through.

• You will make Hormone Boost– friendly food choices. Incredibly, a study from Psychological Science (December 2012) found that people who worked in a neat space for 10 minutes were twice as likely to choose an apple over a chocolate bar than those who worked in a messy office for the same amount of time. Clutter at work or home is stressful for the brain, which makes you more likely to resort (consciously or unconsciously) to coping mechanisms such as choosing comfort foods or overeating. Plus, kitchen decluttering, “detoxing” of hormone disruptors and organization of foods and meals (i.e., stocking up on nutritious foods, preparing protein-rich meal-on-the-go options and smoothies, prepping fruits and vegetables) will only help to ensure that you make Hormone Boost eating your reality.

Convinced now? I certainly hope so. It’s obvious that paying attention to your surroundings pays off big time. Various chemicals and hormone disruptors are lurking in your environment and they can interfere with your boost. Therefore, our first step is to get rid of those nasty things, and the logical place to start is—no surprise—the kitchen.

The Kitchen Boost

When it comes to starting any new personal health regimen, the kitchen is surely target number one. So many bad habits are formed—and fed— in this important spot in your home. It’s vital that you spend a bit of time in the kitchen, making sure there’s nothing standing in the way of your success.

Let’s start with a list of foods you should never eat; in fact, I recommend that you remove them from your kitchen immediately to prevent further hormonal disruption.

• Products containing artificial sweeteners (aspartame, sucralose, etc.)

• Products containing high- fructose corn syrup

• Vegetable oil, shortening, margarine, cottonseed oil; anything containing partially hydrogenated oils and products containing trans fats

• Processed and packaged foods that contain lots of preservatives, loads of sodium and few nutrients (e.g., prepared pasta or rice side dishes)

Once you’ve got a handle on your cupboards and fridge, the next step of your kitchen boost is to get rid of your plastic food storage containers and replace them with glass.

In part two, we explore the essential tools any Hormone Boost-ready kitchen must have. By being proactive and prepared you’ll ensure success and minimize frustration.

Originally Published: July 17, 2017

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Dr. Natasha Turner, NDContributor and Founder & Director of Clear Medicine Wellness Boutique  

+ Read Bio

Dr. Natasha Turner, ND is a regular contributor to various publications and television programs as a natural health expert. Shows like The Dr. Oz Show, The Marilyn Denis Show, Canada AM, CP24, CTV News, Breakfast Television, Rogers TV, Shaw TV, and more have used her expertise to educate audiences. Print publications include SELF, ELLE, Glow, Canadian Business, Health, Today’s Parent, Lush The Magazine, Alive, National Post, Metro, Tonic, Vista, Fit Life, Cocoa, Viva, Healthy Living Now, Get Outside, and several websites, including a regular column for Chatelaine.com, Blisstree.com, and Huffingtonpost.ca.