Sharon Harrison

Living Longer, Living Stronger: Anti-aging wisdom for all generations

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As a species, we are living longer than ever before and the figures for Canada reflect global trends. Governments are worried, health care professionals are starting to feel the effects of an aging population and many others are concerned about the consequences of aging. What happens when a population lives longer than previous generations? What effect will it have on the country, the economy and the healthcare system?

Statistics Canada’s latest figures show a life expectancy of 83 for females and 79 for males—men have always lagged behind women in longevity. In 1980, Canadian women could expect to live on average to age 79, in 1970 the figure was 76 and in 1960, it was 74. In 1950, the average life expectancy for women was 71, in 1940 it was 66 and in 1920 the number was 61. 

Over the course of about 90 years, a woman’s life expectancy in Canada has increased by an astonishing 22 years. Men aren’t far behind at 20 years. Longevity in Canada differs very slightly by province with Ontario and British Columbia holding top spots and Newfoundland and Labrador coming in last place.

Living longer may sound like a positive thing, but if those extended years are miserable, pain-filled, present physical challenges and lack a respectable quality of life, some would argue what point is there to living into our 90s, 100s and beyond if we struggle to sustain a manageable quality of life.

Living a long, healthy, wholesome life is key to maintaining a happy and fulfilled existence well into old age. There are many reasons contributing to longer life expectancy figures, including improved medical care and knowledge, education, better nutrition and so on. When we know better, we tend to do better. 

Typically, what we do in our 20s, 30s and 40s can affect how we age and how we manage our health through our 70s, 80s and 90s. Treat your body well and it should repay you in later life. Call it an insurance policy. Abuse it too often and it may let you down when you least expect it.

Life expectancy from birth has increased dramatically since 1900 in Canada where women could once expect to live to just 50 years of age and men to only 47 years. While life expectancy has undergone dramatic change in the past century, living longer is one thing, living longer in good health is quite another. 

While longevity is often linked to good genes, our DNA is just one small factor in the healthy aging equation. Since we can’t change our DNA, our sex or our age, focus should be on those factors where we have control such as exercise, nutrition and maintaining regular check-ups with a physician or health care provider.  

In Ontario, there are programs in place for women to have regular pap tests and mammograms, and for men, prostate cancer checks. Regular colon cancer checks for both male and females are also recommended as we age. These preventative measures are designed to catch the worst types of cancers early. 

Detecting serious disease in its early stages can mean the difference between life and death—or at least a significantly decreased quality of life living with and managing a serious illness. Early detection in such cases is paramount. 

None of us know what is around the corner when it comes to our health. There is no crystal ball. Sometimes it can just be simply luck. A key component to living well is prevention. It’s far easier to prevent disease than it is to treat it or live with it. 

Along with early detection and prevention, comes moderation. ‘Moderation in everything’ used to be something parents and grandparents would preach to younger generations.

Until recently, smoking and lung cancer were big killers. We live in an age where studies abound on how sitting is the new smoking. It is said loneliness is a modern epidemic. We live in a world where retirement is no longer guaranteed or an automatic requirement. We live in a time where at age 60 or 65, we are no longer put out to pasture where retirees begin a life of slippers and rocking chair once they receive their long service award.

Older generations can teach us a lot about aging dos and don’ts. Ask an older person about their secret to longevity and they may proudly say they never smoked or they remained tee-total—some gleefully insist a tot of whisky is their secret. Others will say having family around makes a difference. Some will say laughter is important. A few will state they kept moving their old bodies even when it hurt to do so. Others will say they did the daily crossword to keep their mind sharp.

Recent studies remind us how loneliness is now the biggest killer of older adults. Social activities, getting involved and staying active is essential. Intimate connections may help us live longer and stronger, but social relationships work just as well. As human beings, we need face-to-face connections and interaction, especially as we age.

Whether baby boomer, Gen Xer, octogenarian or millennial, it’s never too early or too late to begin living and aging well. Treat life as an insurance policy: the more you put in and the longer you contribute, the more you get out of it when you need it the most.   

The secret to longevity, the new anti-aging, might be to never stop moving, never stop learning, never stop doing. The ‘use it or lose it’ philosophy still holds true in the 21st century. Aging well means acting smart, but life without a little a fun, daring to step outside your comfort zone, or taking a giant leap of faith from time-to-time is just plain dull. Get out and enjoy every day to the fullest because life should be a blast at any age.

 

Originally Published: April 26, 2018

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Sharon Harrison, Contributor

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Sharon Harrison is a writer, editor and former intellectual property administrator and consultant. Whether editorialist, columnist or freelance reporter, Sharon is a storyteller, photographer, researcher and contributor to many lifestyle publications and media outlets including Grapevine, The Link, The Wellington Times and Countylive. When not hunting for the next interesting story or capturing the perfect photograph, Sharon has a penchant for nutrition and healthy living — and dark chocolate. A foodie, life-long gardener and art lover with a curiosity for mosaics, her inspiration for life comes from the picturesque beauty of Prince Edward County.



Togetherness and Mealtimes: Sharing the connection of family and food

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Winter is a time for comfort food and home-cooked meals. The oven can be turned on once again, its warmth appreciated rather than riled. Delicious scents emanate from the kitchen as homes fill with familiar smells that simply make us feel good. The blustery and chilly days of winter often keep us indoors.

It may be a memory from a grandmother, a favourite chocolate brownie recipe or a pot of aromatic tomato and basil soup that ensures we gravitate to the kitchen; it’s about familiarity, feeling connected and the comforts of home.

Big stock pots of soup made from the bounty of fall simmer on stove tops, stews slowly bubble, cakes and cookies turn golden as they bake.

Crisps and crumbles made from the abundance of apples gathered in the fall can be baked, stored in the freezer and consumed all winter long, preserving the memory of a fun apple-picking day at the orchard.

Delicious baked spaghetti squash can be appreciated through winter; butternut squash adds substance to soups and stews. Winter eating can be healthy; vegetables collected in the fall are packed with nutrients and vitamins and many will store for weeks or months.

The importance of eating together cannot be underestimated. There is something very special about sitting down together with family and friends to share a meal, no matter how small or insignificant the offerings.

The warmth of a kitchen in winter, the gathering of familiar faces sees people gravitate to simmering soups, warming casseroles or bubbling sweet fruit pies.

Some families seldom experience the joy of sitting at a table with others to eat a meal together. Kids eat alone in bedrooms, while they are using the computer or perched in front of a television screen. It’s a learned behaviour. Once upon a time, families would sit together at the table for all meals.

The 21st century saw a move away from this most basic and important ritual as family members proceeded to eat different meals on different schedules. Life got busy, schedules became chaotic and technology came along invading our lives like never before as families simply drifted apart. Twenty-first century life has become disjointed and in our so-called connected world, families have become disconnected.

Eating alone all the time isn’t good for us. Eating together is therapeutic, even if it’s only for one meal a day. Eating at a table with others gives us a chance to talk to one another, discuss the day or the latest world event, share anxieties or celebrate something special. It’s quality bonding time. People need conversation and face- to-face communication. It’s a small but extraordinarily effective thing: getting back to basics, carving out meaningful slots of time to spend with family during mealtimes.

Family dinners build relationships and it is recognized that kids do better in school as a result.

Studies show that children who do not eat meals with family members are more likely to encounter absenteeism issues at school. They are also more likely to be overweight. Those who did eat meals with family showed in studies to be better off academically, were less likely to use drugs or alcohol and generally chose more healthy food choices.

Food doesn’t have to glamorous or fancy: even the simplest meal choices eaten together can have enormous benefits enhancing our quality of life.

In her book “A Book of Mediterranean Food”, Elizabeth David wrote in 1950 about how we eat rather than what we eat.

Many countries around the world embrace the act of meal preparation as a family where eating together is a ritual, something not to be rushed, but savoured and enjoyed. Even the poorest people living in the poorest countries globally make and consume food together no matter what the food is or how much (or little) they have to work with. Mealtimes in some cultures are respected and sacred as food is prepared and consumed in a slow, mindful and meaningful manner.

The experience of sitting down together at a table doesn’t have to include the formality of a linen tablecloth, fine china or fancy flatware. Enjoying food with others is about laughing together and the act of sharing time with others, immersing one’s self in conversation, exchanging the stories of the day.

Eating together can make us feel relaxed and content and is often associated with positive feelings and pleasant memories. It’s a universal experience. It’s even known to lower cholesterol and blood pressure levels and can help improve digestion. It has also been linked to reducing the likelihood of chronic disease, thereby increasing longevity.

“To eat is a necessity, but to eat intelligently is an art,” said 17th- century writer François de La Rochefoucauld. You just have to be motivated and willing to change old habits.

Sitting together at the kitchen table, a mother can bond with a child; a brother with a sister. It’s a learning experience for the child as new behaviors are observed. Go one step further and drag the kids along to the local farmers’ market. Get them to check out the produce with you and allow them to help with selection. Allow them to participate in the process and work in the kitchen preparing the meal. It is well documented that kids who are exposed to all elements of food preparation carry it with them through to adulthood. And while not necessarily a scientific fact, it’s often said that couples who eat together, stay together.

Passing skills onto the next generation, instilling a passion for cooking and the benefits that come with sharing mealtimes is vital. Restoring family traditions and having little ones make new traditions is the true essence of family life. Memories of grandma’s chocolate chip cookies or dad’s slightly-burned macaroni and cheese should be preserved and carried through the generations.

Eating together is about securing connections, developing social skills, establishing new traditions as old recipes are preserved and new ones are created. We all have to eat, so why not do it together and make mealtimes more meaningful.

Eat simply and eat together.
— Elizabeth David (1913-1992)

 

Originally Published: December 4, 2017

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about the author.jpg
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Sharon Harrison, Contributor

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Sharon Harrison is a writer, editor and former intellectual property administrator and consultant. Whether editorialist, columnist or freelance reporter, Sharon is a storyteller, photographer, researcher and contributor to many lifestyle publications and media outlets including Grapevine, The Link, The Wellington Times and Countylive. When not hunting for the next interesting story or capturing the perfect photograph, Sharon has a penchant for nutrition and healthy living — and dark chocolate. A foodie, life-long gardener and art lover with a curiosity for mosaics, her inspiration for life comes from the picturesque beauty of Prince Edward County.



Have Vision, Will Travel: Redefining the Desire to Roam

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Written by Sharon Harrison

Healthy Living Now | healthy living | healthy living Ontario | healthy living Canada | wellness | wellness Ontario | wellness Canada | fitness | fitness Ontario | fitness Canada | healthy eating | healthy eating Ontario | healthy eating Canada | mindfulness | mindfulness Ontario | mindfulness Canada | lifestyle | Ontario lifestyle | Canadian lifestyle | family | Ontario family | Ontario family magazine | Canadian family | David Suzuki | Dr. Natasha Turner, N.D. | Dr. Oz   | living green | green living | green living Ontario | green living Canada | green living magazine | family strategies | family strategies Ontario | family strategies Canada | products new & now | healthy products | healthy products Ontario | healthy products Canada | lifestyle products | lifestyle products Ontario | lifestyle products Canada | healthy living products | Ontario healthy living products | Canadian healthy living products |  beauty | beauty products | Ontario beauty | Ontario beauty products | Canadian beauty | Canadian beauty products | fashion | fashion products | Ontario fashion | Ontario fashion products | Canadian fashion | Canadian fashion products | home | home products | Ontario home | Ontario home products | Canadian home | Canadian home product | Healthy Living Now  Fall 2017  |  Sharon Harrison

After a summer spent relaxing, taking vacations or visiting family and friends, autumn seems an odd time to be thinking about travel. For some, it is the best time of year to take up the challenge as fall travel options can offer more flexibility. The weather is often more agreeable, accommodation and flights cheaper, the price of gas magically goes down, the kids are back in school and things are generally a little more relaxed.

The German word “wanderlust” first used circa 1850 is defined as “a strong, innate desire to rove or travel about”.

The travel bug can take hold sometimes without warning, and for some it is a call they must answer. Others will wander and discover, seeking out new things for a few years, but once it’s out of their system, the pull for adventure subsides as life gets busy. Sometimes, the need for exploration resurfaces once family has grown and flown, and desire and finances allow for greater opportunities.

 

Travelling doesn’t have to be a visit to a far and distance land. The desire to roam could mean driving an hour from home to explore a new place. The destination need not be a thousand miles away; it could just as easily be one hundred miles or less from base.

Whether you decide to rove far or near, for some a trip of a lifetime, often to an exotic locale, is a must-do on their agenda. It could be a bucket list item or a way to mark a significant milestone. The trip may be a solitary one, perhaps to forget a bad relationship or simply to allow thinking time away from everyday schedules. It was Julia Roberts who showed women everywhere just how this can be achieved in Elizabeth Gilbert’s book and cinematic adaptation of Eat Pray Love.

Travel in its many forms can be many things to many people. It can teach the intrepid traveller new things, educate us, change our outlook on life; make us more creative, inspire us, fill our minds with extraordinary ideas, exposing us to different cultures, showing us different places and perhaps most importantly, introduce us to people who we may not get to interact with on an average day. Travel can broaden horizons and the mind, allowing us to grow and develop as individuals. Going on a jaunt can mean pressing the reset button as it may even alter the path and direction we may take going forward.

Not everyone has the opportunity to discover new and extraordinary lands because adventure isn’t always a possibility. But what about virtual travel? Online browsing has never been easier to access: almost every town in the world is there, right at our fingertips waiting to be discovered and explored. While knowledge was once gained mainly through books and in libraries, thanks to people, the internet, Google Street View and more, we can view almost any place from almost any location on the planet.

Why not stay home, pick a country or a town at will from a map, insert a place name into a search engine and see where it takes you? Or grab a few travel books or magazines from the library or bookstore. Call it travelling without travelling as we allow ourselves to be transported to the other side of the world in a few clicks of a mouse or from the pages of a book. Some call it desktop travelling, others virtual touring, but why not allow your computer or device to take you far and wide while you redefine what travel means to you? Check out local hotels, the city’s art galleries, places of interest and the sights and sounds of a random place without ever leaving home as you embark on your unique journey.

Travelling should always about the journey rather than the destination and can be a reminder of what we can achieve as individuals; it refocuses the mind, and if we glean nothing else from it, it allows us to dream of adventure and exotic places, people and food, and maybe even love. It’s about connecting, stepping outside our comfort zone and satisfying a need.

Embarking on an excursion can make you feel good, filling you with wondrous thoughts, providing you with new ideas to pursue. And while travelling can be an exhausting experience, it also has the ability to replenish energy stores and renew our enthusiasm and zest for life.

Would you have the courage to travel alone to places unknown?

While planning is key for any adventure, not least because it can save you time, trouble and money, simply taking off, spontaneously following paths unknown is greatly encouraged as you let the road map your way. Whether it’s defined as wanderlust or something else entirely, the desire for discovering new places, the lust for a change of scenery, or the need to simply wander maybe just what the doctor ordered.

Travel is good for brain and heart health. Known to decrease depression, increase happiness, lower stress levels, help with anxiety and improve mood, travel can expand the mind, expose you to new people, new places and new situations. Taking time off can make you more productive at work and improve personal relationships, and the benefits to our mental health and self-esteem are extensive and long lasting.

Next time you decide to stay home rather than take a trip, even a short one, consider this: those who make travel a part of life can generally expect a longer life expectancy. And what better way to celebrate United Nations World Tourism Day which falls annually each September 27th.


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The Human Connection to Music

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Written by Sharon Harrison

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Most of us are not musicians by trade and we are not musically inclined or trained. We do not possess the talent to master an instrument, nor do we have the perfect vocal cords to call ourselves professional singers. Many of us do enjoy listening to music, whether it’s at a live concert for a favourite band, enjoying Mozart`s Piano Concerto No.23 in A major, or listening to the local radio station blasting out hits from the ‘70s, ‘80s and ‘90s.

“After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.”
— Aldous Huxley

What does music mean to us? Woven through our everyday lives, it plays a central role in our mental health and is very much a part of us and is often taken for granted. What effect does it have on us and what role does it really play? Music in its many forms is part of what makes us human, but could we survive without it and how difficult would it be to function without the dulcet tones of a familiar tune to soothe or entertain us? Why do we need music in our lives? Does the type of music on our playlist tell us much about our personality or our mood for example? Can we determine someone’s character just because they prefer hard rock over jazz or rap?

How do we connect to music, or put another way, what is the role of music and its interconnectedness to us? Understood by many no matter the country of origin, music is the ultimate universal language. Music brings people together. While it is most often associated with pleasure or happy situations, it can be linked with difficult, sad or melancholic times. Music can be many things to many people and can make us feel and express different things, triggering different emotions, stimulating varying responses, especially on a deeply personal level. Music can be whatever you want it to be. Music can also be a distraction. It can make us feel good or feel better, sending messages of positivity, uplifting our spirits. Music can heal us in ways we may not immediately realize or appreciate. It can get you motivated, change your mood or even help you concentrate.

Music is known to relax us; it can bring joy, trigger a memory or it may comfort or calm us. It can make our hearts soar, get our toes tapping or reduce us to tears. Music can be unpredictable. It can even give us goose bumps. Hearing a familiar tune can make us spontaneously burst into song, sometimes at the top of our lungs. Others may hum along a little more discretely. But music can also be repetitious, irritating or unpleasant and not always to our liking.

“Without music, life would be a mistake.”
— Friedrich Nietzsche

Music can be unsettling. It can also drive us a little crazy sometimes: remember how a tune gets into your head and no matter what you do, it stays there for days running over and over in your mind? Some people aren’t affected by earworms, others are plagued by them. But how does a tune find its way into our mind refusing to leave?

Some people connect with the words of a song where the lyrics can send a profound message. Others are attracted to the tempo or the rhythm. It is one of the reasons many companies use catchy tunes when making commercials. The tune grabs for our attention long before the product does, reeling us in, and before we know it, we are paying attention to what is being offered. People listen to music while they are driving, exercising or showering; others need it to be able to fall asleep, many wake-up to it. We sing hymns at church, play pop music at parties, and sing the national anthem at hockey games. For some, it is more about the instrument than the voice where the strings of a guitar are preferred over the sound of piano keys or the twang of a harp. Some may enjoy the pure singing voice of a soprano while others will appreciate the skill of a talented drummer. Musical tastes vary enormously and are as individual and unique as each of us which explains why some prefer Bieber over Beethoven or Vivaldi over the Village People.

But imagine a world without music. Imagine not hearing a favourite rock song again, or not being able to smooch to a romantic tune or listen to a soft ballad from a cherished music box. Imagine not be able to whistle along to a catchy tune as you wash the dishes. If music was eliminated from our lives, what impact would it have and would we notice its absence? Is the existence of music really so important?

We do know music is good for us and studies have found music has many health benefits. It makes you smarter, happier and more productive. A tune will get your heart pumping and it stimulates the brain in extraordinary ways. Listening to music activates many different areas of the brain, changing our brain chemistry, and if it’s a tune we really like, the brain will release dopamine, the feel good chemical. Next time you find yourself in need of some easy listening, think about its whole effect on the mind, body and soul.

Originally Published: June 27, 2017


Cultivate a Positive Work Environment

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Written by Sharon Harrison

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Full-time workers may spend eight, 10 or more hours each day, five or sometimes six days a week at work. Many people have no option but to work 30, 40 or more years in their lifetime. Add in time spent on commuting and a serious amount of time is spent away from home and family. On average, people spend about one-third of their lives working and that number appears to be growing as people are living longer.

All workplaces should be comfortable and safe spaces where the basic principles for maintaining a happy and healthy workforce are met, whether it’s an office environment, a factory floor or a shop counter. But our work environment isn’t always as nurturing as it should be or conducive to thriving. Work areas can be noisy and distracting making it difficult to concentrate. Corporate and office workers usually get the better deal and some are fortunate to find themselves in beautifully-decorated office towers with designer-inspired touches.

Putting the questionable wallpaper and sleek office furniture aside for a moment, it is people who form the bigger equation in any workplace 

environment. Employees are often haphazardly thrown together in an alien environment where they get to use their education, draw on their training and demonstrate their skills. Of course, it isn’t always as random as we may think. Employees are chosen not just for the skills and talent they bring to an organization, but for their ability to fit into the corporate structure as well as get along with their co-workers.

Workplace environments can be tricky; some can be awkward and others are positively toxic. Much like the school playground, not everyone gets along. Personalities clash and some people simply don’t play nice.

We may not enjoy our chosen career path, nor like the boss or the person in the next cubicle. There are bad habits and inappropriate behaviours. There may be power struggles, jealousy or insecurities—there may be differences in perspectives and working styles. A hostile and dysfunctional workplace helps no one, and a bad atmosphere at work can be frustrating and stressful for everyone concerned.

A solid and proactive management style is essential along with effective and open communication. Meaningful dialogue and a good attitude will go a long way. As with all good relationships, there needs to be trust, respect and fairness. Whether departmental manager, CEO or just a little cog in the bigger wheel, it is important to embrace ideas and listen to others. People need to be heard.

Turn negativity into something positive. Try approaching difficult and challenging situations with understanding, tolerance and an open mind. Practice acceptance. Most people need to feel important and valued; they want to contribute, to be engaged and part of the process, however small or insignificant their role.

No one wants the workplace to be an area of tension, uncertainty or fear—or one of constant conflict. A bad atmosphere is demoralizing. A healthy and safe workplace is paramount—and it is a right. Keep it fun, lighthearted and friendly and the days will go by much faster. A good atmosphere at work makes for a happy and content team of people resulting in a harmonious workplace and a healthy bottom line.

Originally Published: March 27, 2017


Career Mistakes: Do we see ourselves as others do?

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Written by Sharon Harrison

Healthy Living Now | healthy living | healthy living Ontario | healthy living Canada | wellness | wellness Ontario | wellness Canada | fitness | fitness Ontario | fitness Canada | healthy eating | healthy eating Ontario | healthy eating Canada | mindfulness | mindfulness Ontario | mindfulness Canada | lifestyle | Ontario lifestyle | Canadian lifestyle | family | Ontario family | Ontario family magazine | Canadian family | David Suzuki | Dr. Natasha Turner, N.D. | Dr. Oz   | living green | green living | green living Ontario | green living Canada | green living magazine | family strategies | family strategies Ontario | family strategies Canada | products new & now | healthy products | healthy products Ontario | healthy products Canada | lifestyle products | lifestyle products Ontario | lifestyle products Canada | healthy living products | Ontario healthy living products | Canadian healthy living products |  beauty | beauty products | Ontario beauty | Ontario beauty products | Canadian beauty | Canadian beauty products | fashion | fashion products | Ontario fashion | Ontario fashion products | Canadian fashion | Canadian fashion products | home | home products | Ontario home | Ontario home products | Canadian home | Canadian home product | Healthy Living Now  Spring 2017  | Sharon Harrison

Have you ever found yourself in a situation where the promotion you expected didn’t materialize? Were you qualified for the position and ready for the next step, or did you misjudge the situation. Do you have an overinflated view of your abilities and skills? Have you ever wondered why your career isn’t progressing as you had hoped?

Almost everyone wants to get ahead in life; people naturally want their career to progress with the ultimate aim of increasing their rung on the ladder and the financial reward that comes with. What happens when things don’t quite go to plan? Is it possible there are things you could be doing differently in order to get ahead? Sometimes, we are so focused on a single goal we fail to see the bigger picture.

Some people will do almost anything to get ahead as they vie for a step up the corporate ladder, regardless of the impact it may have on co- workers and their ultimate goal. It’s human nature to want to do better, but could we be going about it in the wrong way?

While it may seem obvious to promote your strengths, a person’s weaknesses should not automatically be ruled as something negative. Weaknesses can be qualities, too. Handling difficult situations sensitively and with ease can reveal a lot about us.

Be honest with yourself and expect the same of others. When the chips are down, can you be relied upon to produce results? Are you trustworthy, focused, determined? Are you respected by your peers?

It begins with confidence. Confident people go places, achieve their goals. Once you start believing in yourself, others will too, but there is a fine line between confidence and ego.

Do you see yourself the way others do? If you asked a friend to list three enduring qualities about you, the answer may surprise. Obvious traits such as kindness, compassion and intelligence may come to mind, but the answer may not be what we expect. How we perceive ourselves is important, but perhaps more critically, how do others perceive us? Do others see you as generous or mean? Are you fair or tough to get 

along with? What about sincerity? Do you accept your mistakes graciously? Are you committed to your career?

How do people judge you and how do you judge others? Are you the happy person with a beaming smile or always carrying a frown? Think about how you project yourself. Do you have good posture? What about a signature look that makes you stand out from crowd?

While a dazzling smile may get attention, following through with hard results is essential when trying to make a good impression.

Stand out from the crowd: do something, however small, that will be remembered. Impress others. Turn up. Be punctual. Be prepared. While being late for a meeting or not being properly prepared may get you noticed, it likely won’t gain you any Brownie points in the longer term. Dazzle with knowledge. Building trust with co-workers and managers takes time and effort, so go the extra mile and bring something unexpected to the table. And perhaps most importantly, be passionate about what you do and success will surely follow.

Originally Published: March 20, 2017