Alternative Therapies

How to choose the right Physiotherapist for you?

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How do you, as a patient, choose the right physiotherapist for your injury?

When your doctor or health professional refers your for physiotherapy, it is often hard to know where to go and what to expect. It is always a good idea to ask your friends or family, as they may have good advice for you. If they have a particular facility they recommend, you can call that clinic and ask if they have a physiotherapist who works with people with similar problems to yours. For example: if you are feeling dizzy, there are physiotherapists who specialize in vestibular problems. If you have pelvic floor pain, or are incontinent after delivering your baby, you would be better suited with a pelvic floor physiotherapist. The clinic receptionist should be able to refer you to the physiotherapist who will be able to handle your problem the best.

What do all those letters mean after the physiotherapists name?

Typically the first set of letters are indicating the type of degree that the therapist has obtained that allows them to practice physiotherapy. An Example of these letters is CAMPT.

CAMPT stands for Canadian Academy of Manipulative Physiotherapy. A CAMPT physiotherapist is a physiotherapist who has completed an extensive post – graduate program specializing in hands on therapy treatment techniques. These clinicians utilize very detailed, specific techniques; that help improve pain control, abnormal biomechanics and functional activities. This is achieved by finding and targeting the root of the problem with focused treatment.

CAMPT – certified therapist base their focused treatment on research – guided techniques that help with patient recovery. They will educate you on your condition and reduce the risk of reinjure. FCAMPT is an internationally recognized standard, and those physiotherapists who hold this title, have additional training in assessment and clinical reasoning with an expertise in manual therapy.

CAMPT is part of the international Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Physiotherapist (IFOMPT). The IFOMPT is a subsection of the world health organization (WHO) with the mandate to develop and monitor a standardized, high- level of orthopaedic manual physical therapy worldwide.

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 Manual and manipulative therapy is safe and effective technique that the highly trained physiotherapist, CAMPT are certified to do. Research demonstrates that manipulative techniques are effective to help to restore normal mobility, reduce muscle pain, muscle tension and can help you recover faster and better.

FCAMPTS display this logo on their website, business cars and in their offices.

 
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You can find a FCAMPT on the FCAMPT website or at this address:

https://manippt.org/directory-dashboard/

If you have any questions, please contact us at info@quinteortho.com

Source: CAMPT website, http://manippt.org

Originally Published: July 2, 2018

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Genevieve Bouchard, Contributor and Physiotherapist at Quinte Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation Specialists

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Bringing Home the Spa - Recreating the benefits of hydrotherapy spas at home

Healthy Living Now | healthy living | healthy living Ontario | healthy living Canada | wellness | wellness Ontario | wellness Canada | fitness | fitness Ontario | fitness Canada | healthy eating | healthy eating Ontario | healthy eating Canada | mindfulness | mindfulness Ontario | mindfulness Canada | lifestyle | Ontario lifestyle | Canadian lifestyle | family | Ontario family | Ontario family magazine | Canadian family |  David Suzuki | Dr. Natasha Turner, N.D. | Dr. Oz  | living green | green living | green living Ontario | green living Canada | green living magazine | family strategies | family strategies Ontario | family strategies Canada | products new & now | healthy products | healthy products Ontario | healthy products Canada | lifestyle products | lifestyle products Ontario | lifestyle products Canada | healthy living products | Ontario healthy living products | Canadian healthy living products |  beauty | beauty products | Ontario beauty | Ontario beauty products | Canadian beauty | Canadian beauty products | fashion | fashion products | Ontario fashion | Ontario fashion products | Canadian fashion | Canadian fashion products | home | home products | Ontario home | Ontario home products | Canadian home | Canadian home products  | Hydrotherapy |   Fall 2017 |   Bringing Home the Spa - Recreating the benefits of hydrotherapy spas at home | Kelly Gillis, ND

When you think of a trip to the spa, it conjures up images of facials, nail treatments, body wraps and massages. But spas weren’t always havens for simply the beautification of the physical body.

Traditionally, they were places people would go to “take the waters”; to immerse, cleanse and bathe themselves in healing waters meant to rejuvenate the body, mind and spirit. The use of water in this healing way is called hydrotherapy.

And this is how we can bring hydrotherapy home. There are many ways to use water in your own home that will bring about the same responses in the body, and effectively stimulate the same healing and relaxation.

Hydrotherapy has been shown in recent years to benefit a vast number of conditions including: improving cholesterol levels and high blood pressure, promoting quality and duration of sleep, reducing stress and anxiety, pain management (especially osteoarthritis), improving immune function, boosting metabolism, and supporting overall feelings of wellbeing, among others.

Given the wide range of possible benefits, it’s easy to see why the therapy is enjoying a resurgence with the success of such hydrotherapy- focused spas and resorts as Nordik, Body Blitz and Scandinave Spa. 

Typically located in beautiful, outdoor, natural settings, spa-goers are encouraged to spend long hours languidly transitioning through a series of pools, saunas, and rest stations of varying temperatures.

This simple transition from very warm (some steam rooms can be close to 100 degrees Celsius) to very cold water (often just a few degrees above freezing) is the true secret behind hydrotherapy; the drastic temperature change creates a number of complex physiological and biochemical changes within the body. Cycling through alternating hot and cold water stimulates these cellular and chemical changes, which are responsible for the benefits that we expect from hydrotherapy.

And this is how we can bring hydrotherapy home. There are many ways to use water in your own home that will bring about the same responses in the body, and effectively stimulate the same healing and relaxation.

One of the simplest and most effective home practices is the alternating shower. For this treatment all you need is your standard home shower. Simply turn the water temperature up so that it feels very warm to hot (but not so hot that it is uncomfortable). Stand in the water for up to three minutes, and then abruptly change the temperature to as cold as you can tolerate (this will feel like a bit of a shock!) Stand under the cold water for no more than one minute, and then return the temperature to hot. Repeat this cycle three to five times, ending with a cold stream.

You can use a similar technique to enjoy the benefits of hydrotherapy at home in a number of different ways, such as a simple foot bath, or (carefully) jumping in and out of the backyard hot tub to get sprayed down with the garden hose.

However you choose to practice hydrotherapy at home, there are a few key principles to keep in mind to maximize your hydrotherapeutic benefit. The first is that the warm phase should always be longer than the cold phase by a ratio of about 3:1; for example, if your hot phase only lasts one minute, the cold should last no longer than 20 seconds. The second is to always end on cold - this leaves the body a little bit cool, which then demands that it warm itself once again, increasing metabolic rate and blood flow. And, as with any new practice, don’t overdo it, especially at the beginning. If the extremes of temperature seem like too much to tolerate, work your way up to it by starting with warm-cool transitions, and build up to hot-cold.

 

Originally Published: September 30, 2017

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Kelly Gillis, ND, Contributor and naturopathic doctor practicing in her hometown of Belleville, Ontario at the Belleville Integrative Health Centre

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Dr. Kelly is a naturopathic doctor practicing in her hometown of Belleville, Ontario at the Belleville Integrative Health Centre. She trained as a naturopath at the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine in Toronto, Ontario and prior to that, completed an honours undergraduate degree in Health Promotion at Laurentian University. She is licensed and registered with the College of Naturopaths of Ontario, and is a member of the Ontario Association of Naturopathic Doctors and the Canadian Association of Naturopathic Doctors.