How to choose the right Physiotherapist for you?

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How do you, as a patient, choose the right physiotherapist for your injury?

When your doctor or health professional refers your for physiotherapy, it is often hard to know where to go and what to expect. It is always a good idea to ask your friends or family, as they may have good advice for you. If they have a particular facility they recommend, you can call that clinic and ask if they have a physiotherapist who works with people with similar problems to yours. For example: if you are feeling dizzy, there are physiotherapists who specialize in vestibular problems. If you have pelvic floor pain, or are incontinent after delivering your baby, you would be better suited with a pelvic floor physiotherapist. The clinic receptionist should be able to refer you to the physiotherapist who will be able to handle your problem the best.

What do all those letters mean after the physiotherapists name?

Typically the first set of letters are indicating the type of degree that the therapist has obtained that allows them to practice physiotherapy. An Example of these letters is CAMPT.

CAMPT stands for Canadian Academy of Manipulative Physiotherapy. A CAMPT physiotherapist is a physiotherapist who has completed an extensive post – graduate program specializing in hands on therapy treatment techniques. These clinicians utilize very detailed, specific techniques; that help improve pain control, abnormal biomechanics and functional activities. This is achieved by finding and targeting the root of the problem with focused treatment.

CAMPT – certified therapist base their focused treatment on research – guided techniques that help with patient recovery. They will educate you on your condition and reduce the risk of reinjure. FCAMPT is an internationally recognized standard, and those physiotherapists who hold this title, have additional training in assessment and clinical reasoning with an expertise in manual therapy.

CAMPT is part of the international Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Physiotherapist (IFOMPT). The IFOMPT is a subsection of the world health organization (WHO) with the mandate to develop and monitor a standardized, high- level of orthopaedic manual physical therapy worldwide.

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 Manual and manipulative therapy is safe and effective technique that the highly trained physiotherapist, CAMPT are certified to do. Research demonstrates that manipulative techniques are effective to help to restore normal mobility, reduce muscle pain, muscle tension and can help you recover faster and better.

FCAMPTS display this logo on their website, business cars and in their offices.

 
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You can find a FCAMPT on the FCAMPT website or at this address:

https://manippt.org/directory-dashboard/

If you have any questions, please contact us at info@quinteortho.com

Source: CAMPT website, http://manippt.org

Originally Published: July 2, 2018

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Genevieve Bouchard, Contributor and Physiotherapist at Quinte Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation Specialists

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COMING SOON



Wellness from the Wild: Soothing Catnip

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Around Ontario, wild catnip is often found coming up in fields and gardens in early spring. It’s a good plant to know about because of its many safe, effective healing properties.

Catnip (Nepeta cataria) is a mint family (Lamiaceae) plant with rounded toothed leaves growing in opposite pairs on a square (four-sided) stem. Tiny soft hairs on the leaves and stems give the plant a velvety texture. In cooler weather, its green colour is often mixed with shades of purple, especially on the leaf undersides. When rubbed, the plant gives off a slightly pungent, mint-like aroma--one that famously attracts felines! While it makes cats energetic and “high” however, catnip has the opposite effect on humans.

This plant has been used throughout history and is still in use today as a mild, calming, antispasmodic agent. Like many mint family plants, catnip is a carminative herb. It has a soothing action on the smooth muscles of the digestive tract, relaxing the cramps and spasms of indigestion. This calming action can also affect cramping in the lower abdomen, sometimes helping to ease menstrual cramps. It has been used safely for infants with colic. It helps to relax the mind and diminish anxiety, and is known among herbalists as a safe, effective remedy for bedwetting in children.

Catnip is a supportive remedy for the child in all of us. For those with insomnia or troubling dreams, a cup of catnip tea can act like a lullaby, soothing us into a peaceful sleep. Those coming home with tension and stress from a tough day of work will often find their worries calmed and tensions eased with catnip’s gentle influence.

The leaves and flowers are the parts generally used. The stems can be cut, about four inches off the tops of the plant, allowing the remainder of the plant to regenerate (which it should be able to do with ease). These can either be used fresh, or dried for future use. To dry the herb, lay out your harvest in a basket or on a cotton sheet in a warm, dry place out of direct light and leave there for a few days or over a week, until the leaves or stems make a snapping noise when broken. This indicates that they’re dry and can be stored in a jar, out of direct light. The fresh herb can also be tied in bundles with a string and hung to dry.

One teaspoon of crushed up dried herb, or one handful of fresh herb will make one cup of catnip tea. Pour hot water over the herb and steep, covered for at least ten minutes. Then strain and drink. Honey can be added if desired. For infants, diluted tea can be given in a bottle for colic, or nursing mothers can drink the tea, providing their infants with its benefits via the breast milk. To alleviate bedwetting, the same strength brew can be made but with half as much water, so that less liquid is given to drink before bed.

Catnip can truly be considered a quintessential soother. She reminds us of her peace bringing ways with her early spring leaves, assuring us that winter has finally ended. As the plant grows and the season warms, she invites us, humans and cats alike, to bask safe and warm in the healing sunlight.

 

Originally Published: April 30, 2018

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Tamara Segal, Contributor and Registered Herbalist

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Tamara Segal is a Registered Herbalist and wild foods enthusiast. She runs an herbal clinic called Hawthorn Herbals at her farm in Prince Edward County. She also teaches classes and gives plant identification walks and workshops throughout the Quinte area.



Wellness from the Wild: The Majestic White Pine

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Northeastern landscapes could be characterized by the silhouette images of the Eastern white pine tree. These trees, of Group of Seven

fame, outline many a horizon with their high, fluffy-looking, outward reaching evergreen branches. Our native white pine (Pinus strobus) has been considered the monarch of the Canadian forest—and for good reason. This tree offers a cornucopia of healing and nutritional support.

White pine is identified by its long, soft needles which form clusters in groups of five, while other types of pines form needle clusters of just two. White pine needles also have a white stripe running lengthwise from the base to the tip.

The needles are richly nutritious with vitamins A, C and K. A tea made with a small handful of needles steeped in one to two cups of water for 10 to 15 minutes has a mild citrus-like flavour. A cup of this tasty brew can help to fight respiratory infections and boost immunity. The tea will be more potent if covered while it steeps. This helps to keep the aromatic volatile oils (which contain many healing constituents) from evaporating out. A little lemon juice and/or honey could enhance its effectiveness and make it even tastier.

Pine needles and bark have strong anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, particularly in the respiratory tract. They can help to open the bronchial passages in cases of congestion and asthma. Their tea, being rich in flavonoids and antioxidants, can also serve as a healthful tonic that supports cardiovascular, as well as eye and skin health.

The pine trees of this region thrive in cold, dark winters as well as the heat of summer, pulling up vitamins and minerals from deep in the earth, and assimilating energy through their evergreen leaves with the help of the northeastern sunlight. Their ability to adapt themselves to harsh conditions in a healthy way is indicative of the medicine they provide. White pine is considered by some herbalists to be an adaptogen- a class of herbs that safely and effectively support the body through periods of physical and mental stress, nourishing and balancing the endocrine, immune, nervous and cardiovascular systems.

Adaptogens often support adrenal gland function. The adrenals secrete hormones that regulate the body and mind’s stress response. White pine helps to balance the stress response in an elegant and sophisticated manner such as that associated with adaptogens. It also tends to lift the spirits, and brighten one’s outlook on dark and dreary days.

White pine can be harvested at any time of year—even in the deep dormancy of winter. A hike beneath the white pines in the crisp forest air on a sunny, snowy day is sure to lift the heart, facilitate deep breathing and shake off the winter blues. On such a walk, you may encounter a freshly fallen branch, with bundles of healthy green needles on it. With gratitude for the tree’s gift, this can be brought home. The bark can be shaved off with a knife, and the needles removed by hand. These can be steeped fresh into a healing tea, and/or dried and stored in a jar in the cupboard, perhaps for another winter day.

The monarch of the Canadian forest grants us with abundant gifts. It is ours to learn to appreciate them.

 

Originally Published: December 16, 2017

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Tamara Segal, Contributor and Registered Herbalist

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Tamara Segal is a Registered Herbalist and wild foods enthusiast. She runs an herbal clinic called Hawthorn Herbals at her farm in Prince Edward County. She also teaches classes and gives plant identification walks and workshops throughout the Quinte area.



Yellow Dock

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Autumn has arrived--the season for harvesting roots! From root vegetables to the roots of medicinal herbs, the fall offers us gifts from beneath the soil. At this time of year, plants send their nutrients and energy down into their roots for winter storage, enriching them with nourishing and healing elements.

One of my favourite local wild roots is yellow dock (Rumex crispus). Also known as “curly dock”, this dock family biennial is easily found throughout our region. It has leaves that are longer than they are wide (up to about one foot long), with white-reddish midribs and a long stem. The leaf edges have a curly or wavy appearance and come up in a basal rosette formation. In its second year of growth, yellow dock shoots up a tall flowering stalk with a cluster of tiny whitish-green flowers. When it eventually develops seeds, the whole stalk, seeds included, turns a reddish-bronze hue and remains that way throughout the winter. Beneath the ground, yellow dock’s long tap root has flesh that is an unmistakable shade of yellow—hence the name!

The yellow roots indicate an important signature of this plant: it effectively promotes bile production and movement.

The liver and gall bladder are largely supported by yellow dock root. When yellow bile flows freely through the digestive tract, it helps us to break down and absorb fats, allowing further nutrient absorption while also carrying out wastes and toxins so that they don’t build up and burden our organs of elimination. Thus yellow dock root is an excellent herbal digestive aid, helping us to absorb the nutrients we need while clearing out toxicity, keeping us healthy and energized.

Yellow dock also has a strong affinity for the skin, helping to clear eczema and other rashes and irritations that sometimes stem from an inhibited or overburdened liver’s challenged ability to clear toxins. When toxins or immune by-products build up in the system and the liver can’t easily clear them, they will often be cleared through the pores of the skin, causing various skin irritations. Yellow dock root helps to relieve these conditions by working from the inside out.

The deep tap roots accumulate iron, making yellow dock a choice supplement for iron deficiency. The root, infused in apple cider vinegar will readily secrete iron and other trace minerals into the vinegar, which can be strained after three to four weeks, and safely taken daily (one to three teaspoons) until iron levels increase. While many iron supplements tend to cause constipation, yellow dock has mild laxative properties, supporting proper elimination while supplying the needed iron.

All this aid in clearing away wastes and toxins helps to prevent infections, while also freeing up the immune system to stay on strict guard against any potential invading pathogens— thus yellow dock root strengthens immune function too.

This wild plant is so hardy that it is often found breaking through pavement or thriving in neglected, compacted soil. It also comes up as a “weed” in fields and gardens, where it can be dug in the autumn of its first year. The cleaned, sliced root infused in cider vinegar or dried and stored for use as a tea, is an invaluable addition to anyone’s herb cupboard, and should stay viable for two to three years. With all this in mind, in root harvest season...I dig yellow dock!

 

Originally published: October 12, 2017

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Tamara Segal, Contributor and Registered Herbalist

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Tamara Segal is a Registered Herbalist and wild foods enthusiast. She runs an herbal clinic called Hawthorn Herbals at her farm in Prince Edward County. She also teaches classes and gives plant identification walks and workshops throughout the Quinte area.



Bringing Home the Spa - Recreating the benefits of hydrotherapy spas at home

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When you think of a trip to the spa, it conjures up images of facials, nail treatments, body wraps and massages. But spas weren’t always havens for simply the beautification of the physical body.

Traditionally, they were places people would go to “take the waters”; to immerse, cleanse and bathe themselves in healing waters meant to rejuvenate the body, mind and spirit. The use of water in this healing way is called hydrotherapy.

And this is how we can bring hydrotherapy home. There are many ways to use water in your own home that will bring about the same responses in the body, and effectively stimulate the same healing and relaxation.

Hydrotherapy has been shown in recent years to benefit a vast number of conditions including: improving cholesterol levels and high blood pressure, promoting quality and duration of sleep, reducing stress and anxiety, pain management (especially osteoarthritis), improving immune function, boosting metabolism, and supporting overall feelings of wellbeing, among others.

Given the wide range of possible benefits, it’s easy to see why the therapy is enjoying a resurgence with the success of such hydrotherapy- focused spas and resorts as Nordik, Body Blitz and Scandinave Spa. 

Typically located in beautiful, outdoor, natural settings, spa-goers are encouraged to spend long hours languidly transitioning through a series of pools, saunas, and rest stations of varying temperatures.

This simple transition from very warm (some steam rooms can be close to 100 degrees Celsius) to very cold water (often just a few degrees above freezing) is the true secret behind hydrotherapy; the drastic temperature change creates a number of complex physiological and biochemical changes within the body. Cycling through alternating hot and cold water stimulates these cellular and chemical changes, which are responsible for the benefits that we expect from hydrotherapy.

And this is how we can bring hydrotherapy home. There are many ways to use water in your own home that will bring about the same responses in the body, and effectively stimulate the same healing and relaxation.

One of the simplest and most effective home practices is the alternating shower. For this treatment all you need is your standard home shower. Simply turn the water temperature up so that it feels very warm to hot (but not so hot that it is uncomfortable). Stand in the water for up to three minutes, and then abruptly change the temperature to as cold as you can tolerate (this will feel like a bit of a shock!) Stand under the cold water for no more than one minute, and then return the temperature to hot. Repeat this cycle three to five times, ending with a cold stream.

You can use a similar technique to enjoy the benefits of hydrotherapy at home in a number of different ways, such as a simple foot bath, or (carefully) jumping in and out of the backyard hot tub to get sprayed down with the garden hose.

However you choose to practice hydrotherapy at home, there are a few key principles to keep in mind to maximize your hydrotherapeutic benefit. The first is that the warm phase should always be longer than the cold phase by a ratio of about 3:1; for example, if your hot phase only lasts one minute, the cold should last no longer than 20 seconds. The second is to always end on cold - this leaves the body a little bit cool, which then demands that it warm itself once again, increasing metabolic rate and blood flow. And, as with any new practice, don’t overdo it, especially at the beginning. If the extremes of temperature seem like too much to tolerate, work your way up to it by starting with warm-cool transitions, and build up to hot-cold.

 

Originally Published: September 30, 2017

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Kelly Gillis, ND, Contributor and naturopathic doctor practicing in her hometown of Belleville, Ontario at the Belleville Integrative Health Centre

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Dr. Kelly is a naturopathic doctor practicing in her hometown of Belleville, Ontario at the Belleville Integrative Health Centre. She trained as a naturopath at the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine in Toronto, Ontario and prior to that, completed an honours undergraduate degree in Health Promotion at Laurentian University. She is licensed and registered with the College of Naturopaths of Ontario, and is a member of the Ontario Association of Naturopathic Doctors and the Canadian Association of Naturopathic Doctors.



The Miracles of Mullein

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If you asked me which herbal remedy I would choose to have with me on a desert island, I’d consider choosing mullein. Mullein (Verbascum thaspus) is a wild plant found growing abundantly around our region and in many other parts of the world as well (thus it could also arguably be found growing on our hypothetical desert island). Mullein is a healing herb in numerous aspects.

Often found on dry, rocky or disturbed soil, mullein’s large fuzzy green leaves and tall flowering stalk are hard to miss. It has a two-year lifespan. In the first year, a young basal rosette of leaves grow close to the ground. The leaves can grow up to 25 centimetres long and over 10 centimetres wide. In the second, year, a flowering stalk will grow, and if left undisturbed, can reach over six feet tall. Yellow buds and flowers bloom out of the fuzzy, elongated flower head throughout the summer months.

The flowers can be harvested and infused in olive oil (or other kinds of oil), in a clear glass jar in the sunlight for about a month. The oil can then be strained and stored in a cool, dark place. It can be rubbed onto achy, inflamed joints and tight muscles to relieve pain and inflammation. A cotton swab or cloth dipped into the same oil can be safely placed in the ear for about 15 to 20 minutes daily to help clear, and ease the symptoms of an ear infection.

Mullein leaf can also be infused in oil to make a healing skin salve for cuts, swellings, rashes, burns and bruises. It has a remarkable ability to restore damaged tissue and encourage healthy cell growth. The leaves have been successfully used as a poultice on broken bones to help support repair, and proper structural alignment.

The leaves, either fresh or dried, can be made into a tea by steeping in hot water (about 1 to 2 teaspoons of broken up leaf per cup) for 10 to 20 minutes. Mullein is notably helpful in moving lymphatic fluid, draining clogged lymph nodes and various types of cysts. A cloth dipped in the tea can be placed on the lymph nodes or cysts for about 20 minutes daily, until they clear. The tea can then be drunk for additional support.

Mullein is one of the first herbs I think of when choosing ingredients for a cough remedy. It is a reliable expectorant that also soothes and heals irritated membranes of the respiratory passage while fighting off infection and reducing inflammation. It works well in most types of coughs and lung infections, and can be very helpful for asthmatics too.

Some people prefer to strain mullein tea through a coffee filter. The reason is that the tiny hairs that give the leaves their fuzzy texture are fine enough to make it through a regular strainer or tea ball, and for some people they can tickle the throat a bit. A coffee filter or thick tea bag strains these out nicely.

When giving plant identification walks and workshops, I often expound on mullein’s benefits. I feel confident in sharing its safe, effective restorative capabilities. Also it is easily identified, and there’s enough of it to be found for its gifts to be shared far and wide. Here’s to the many miracles of mullein! With gratitude!

 

Originally Published: August 7, 2017

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Tamara Segal, Contributor and Registered Herbalist

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Tamara Segal is a Registered Herbalist and wild foods enthusiast. She runs an herbal clinic called Hawthorn Herbals at her farm in Prince Edward County. She also teaches classes and gives plant identification walks and workshops throughout the Quinte area.



Massage Therapy: Essential for today’s workload

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We spend eight- plus hours a day working hard at our jobs and careers. Most of our workloads don’t cater to proper biomechanics of the human body. Whether we are simply sitting at a desk for eight hours, standing at a production line performing repetitive movements, performing manual labour, building houses, working construction sites, or delivering heavy packages all day, our bodies aren’t naturally designed to perform many of these activities.

When we force our physical bodies to operate in ways it was not meant to, we start to develop imbalances and compensations within our muscle system. These compensations and imbalanced muscles can produce compression of nerves, deviations of structures, such as your vertebrae, and on-going conditions causing pain. Some of these, if not treated properly, can prevent you from performing at your job and even become life altering, such as carpal tunnel, migraines, and herniated discs through your spine.

Because we cannot always change what we have to do for our workload, we need to make sure we are taking care of our bodies and compensating for the damage we are creating.

Registered massage therapy is a very effective treatment for muscles, soft tissues and joints. By performing different techniques as needed, the soft tissues release the tension built over many hours of hard work. Creating proper blood flow to the areas, breaking up restrictive fibres in the tissues, decompressing pressure through joints and the spine, and mobilizing joints are just some of the outcomes of registered massage therapy that will help combat the workload strain on the body. When you give your body these treatments regularly, your nervous system responds properly and your muscles will stay balanced and relaxed for longer periods of time and resist the pressure of the workload.

It provides improved response to stretches and other modalities you can use to combat the strain such as heat and rest.

Registered massage therapy can also help prevent conditions in the body that are subject to workload strain. These are conditions such as arthritis, wear and tear on joints, degenerative disc disease, and frozen shoulder. If the body undergoes regular treatment or even treatment when there is a concern, the body recognizes how to heal faster and will function at a healthier level, therefore slowing down the process of these conditions developing or progressing.

Massage therapy is essential to your health with any physical workload. Think of it as a component to your health care system. If your body does not move properly without discomfort, or if you are feeling pain through your average daily activities, then this is your body telling you it needs attention. Make sure you are listening and giving your body what it needs to function at its highest potential.

You should be able to perform your daily lifestyle activities and workload without any pain or discomfort. Most companies provide coverage for their employees to receive therapy such as registered massage therapy. Look into your benefits package if you have one and take advantage of this! If you don’t treat your body properly, you’ll feel the negative effects in the long run.

 

Originally Published: May 15, 2017

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Dana Goodfellow, RMT, Contributor and D.Ac., Meditation Teacher, Owner – Quinte Mind & Body

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Dana is the owner of Quinte Mind & Body, and has been a practicing Registered Massage Therapist (RMT) for many years in the Belleville area. Through Dana’s love of learning and providing superior results for her patients, she has added modalities from her knowledge of the body and medical treatment. Two modalities are Contemporary Medical Acupuncture and becoming a Certified Meditation Teacher and Facilitator. As a graduate of an advanced course of Massage Therapy at Georgian College, Dana takes great pride in treating patients with many different manual techniques. After a year in practice, Dana received her certification from McMaster University for Contemporary Medical Acupuncture.



Poplar: Tree of the People

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Humans have known for millennia that society benefits from honey bees. In temperate climates, ancient settlements used to plant poplar trees around them, aiming to attract bees. Poplars provide a resin used by honey bees to create propolis—the antibacterial glue that seals the hive and supports its health. It was once known that if on your travels you found a grove of poplars in the distance, you were likely approaching a human settlement. Where poplars grew, people dwelled. The genus of these trees was thus aptly named Populus-- the Latin name for people.

Poplar supports people’s health, and in turn, their enjoyment of life by offering potent anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, digestive and restorative properties. In the early spring, the aromatic buds can be harvested and heated in olive oil to yield the makings of an ointment for pain, inflammation and infections of various kinds. It also makes soothing massage oil. The buds of one species, Populus gileadensis make the famous Balm of Gilead—a remarkable healing balm.

Poplar’s inner bark can be shaved off pruned or newly fallen branches in the early spring and simmered in water to yield a bitter-tasting digestive tea. It will help cleanse and restore a tired, aged or debilitated system, clearing away toxicity, reducing arthritic or rheumatic pain and renewing vigour. Taken in the spring, this tea can help one adapt to the increased activity that comes with the new season, such as outdoor sports, gardening, hiking and the like. The bark contains salicin, the same active pain-relieving ingredient found in aspirin, giving it analgesic and fever-reducing properties. Any bark that is not used fresh can be cut into smaller pieces and dried for future use. It can last for three to four years if stored in a jar and kept away from light.

Later in spring, young poplar leaves can be infused in water for a healing tea. This too has a bitter flavour which indicates its myriad benefits to the digestion, the ability to absorb nutrients and safe, gentle detoxification. To balance out the bitter flavour, one could add mint, cinnamon or lemon verbena to the infusion. Poplar leaves crushed up can be placed on an insect bite to reduce swelling and irritation, making outdoor excursions more fun.

There are a number of Populus species found in our region. Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides), large-toothed aspen (Populus grandidenta), Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra) and balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) are common. Any of these can be used for similar purposes.

Poplars love to grow in sunlight and can be found in clearings, near beaches or at forest edges. Trembling aspens grow in clusters with smooth, narrow light-grey trunks. Lombardy poplars are long, narrow trees that sometimes line lane-ways or paths. Large-toothed aspens have widely serrated leaves compared with those of the other varieties. Balsam poplar has the largest, stickiest leaf buds with a pleasing aroma that spreads on the wind. This species is a big honey bee attractor.

My favourite time to harvest poplar is when taking a walk or hike after a wind storm in early spring when fallen branches, laden with sticky buds, make themselves easily available for use. I am continually impressed by the many uses they offer, and am always grateful to encounter them.

Tamara Segal is a Registered Herbalist and wild foods enthusiast. She teaches classes and gives plant identification walks and workshops in the Quinte area. She also runs an herbal clinic called Hawthorn Herbals at her farm in Prince Edward County.

 

Originally Published: April 17, 2017

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Tamara Segal, Contributor and Registered Herbalist

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Tamara Segal is a Registered Herbalist and wild foods enthusiast. She runs an herbal clinic called Hawthorn Herbals at her farm in Prince Edward County. She also teaches classes and gives plant identification walks and workshops throughout the Quinte area.